AIA Agreements Part 2

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AIA Agreements Part 2 by Aaron Pierce

In part two, we will continue the discussion on AIA agreements. If you’re an owner, a contractor or subcontractor, contact me here with questions or comments about AIA agreements.

Get landlord signoffs wherever appropriate.

The owner of the property, the landlord, has to sign off on practically every little bit of work before it is started. If not, the work will likely be considered a breach of your lease agreement. In this case, you could end up spending a quarter of a million dollars having work done on your property only to have the landlord then claim you breached the lease in doing so, and may even be able to have you evicted.

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What Is in an AIA Agreement? Part 1

What Is in an AIA Agreement? Part 1 by Aaron Pierce

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The AIA A101 is the standard form of agreement furnished by the American Institute of Architects which is used in generating well-defined business relationships between a Pand a contractor. These contracts have been crafted, published, and promoted by a very influential and nationally renowned industry group. Consequently, the standardized version is designed to protect the interests of the contractor and can be protective of a contractor to the sometimes-costly detriment of the rights and flexibilities of the owner.           

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Miscategorizing Employees as Independent Contractors Carries Serious Consequences

Miscategorizing Employees as Independent Contractors Carries Serious Consequences by Aaron Pierce

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It is vital that all employers understand how seriously both the IRS and state agencies take the issue of miscategorizing employees as independent contractors. Any appearance of impropriety is assumed to be the case. It’s understandable when you consider how much money a business can save by classifying an employee as a contractor: employer contributions to Social Security, Medicare, unemployment insurance, and worker’s compensation are non-existent in an independent contractor relationship.

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Forming a Corporation: Legal Documents You Can’t Do Without – Part 1

Forming a Corporation: Legal Documents You Can’t Do Without - Part 1 by Aaron Pierce

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Forming a corporation is a bit like entering into marriage: all the parties need to agree beforehand on how the corporation will work, i.e. what rules the entity will generally function under. Taking the time early on in the formation of the corporation to discuss and implement corporate operating documents will help avoid disruption and additional costs, especially legal fees, later on when disputes almost inevitably arise.

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New York Employment Policies & Employee Handbooks

New York Employment Policies & Employee Handbooks by Aaron Pierce

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Every employer with any number of employees should have written employee policies, delineated in a readily-available employee handbook.

Written policies serve to clarify expectations and reduce the company’s exposure. In many cases, policies must comply with statutory requirements from the state and federal government. I recommend that handbooks be signed by employees upon hiring, to demonstrate that the employee has read, acknowledges, and understands the policies of the company.

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Protecting Your Dream in the Hospitality Industry

Protecting Your Dream in the Hospitality Industry by Aaron Pierce

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Operating a business in New York City is often described as an uphill battle. Zoning laws, safety regulations, and consumer protection measures can eat into any business’ profits—but especially in the hospitality industry. In this blog, I provide food for thought to aspiring restaurateurs and bar owners who are considering setting up shop in the city.

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Protecting Your Art Starts With Properly Drafted Contracts

Protecting Your Art Starts With Properly Drafted Contracts by Aaron Pierce

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When it comes to the sale of visual art, like paintings, sculpture, or photography, the artist-gallery relationship is paramount. In order to make sure this business relationship remains clear and mutually profitable, the artist and gallery need to agree to a contract that meets their needs. Unfortunately, artists will often opt for a quick template or “boilerplate” contract in an attempt to save money or avoid getting mired in contract law. While that may seem like a convenient option, all that does is provide a false sense of security.

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